Water for the Thirsty
Weekly Devotional

Water for the Thirsty

How I Wonder

Weekly Devotional

‘As the deer pants for streams of water so my soul pants for you, O God’. (Psalm 42:1)
‘…Jesus stood and said in a loud voice, "If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me and drink”…’ (John 7:37)

8th May 2010

One of the most popular English nursury rhymes begins,

Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are.
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!

The lyrics are from an early nineteenth-century English poem, “The Star” by Jane Taylor.

We probably haven’t said these words very much since our childhood or since we read them to our children, but as we reflect on them here have you ever considered how important it is to wonder?

Emerson said “Wonder is the seed of science.”

Alfred North Whitehead said that “Philosophy begins in wonder.”

Jose Ortega y Gasset wrote “To be surprised, to wonder, is to begin to understand”

J. Robert Oppenheimer once declared, “There are children playing in the street who could solve some of my top unsolvable problems in physics, because they have modes of sensory perception that I have lost long ago.”

Indeed, tests show that a child's creativity, which includes imagination and wonder, diminishes by 90 percent between ages 5 and 7! And, by the time an adult gets to be 40 years old, he retains only about 2 percent of the creative capacity he held at age 5.

It appears that wonder is a priceless ingredient in the life of any thinking person.

The trouble is that wonder is a rare ingredient.

After all, we do not find it present in most modern worship.

Oh yes, we know all about God. We study; we listen to sermons; we read books that explain what God is all about.

We sing about God, analyse His attributes, and identify His works.

Furthermore, we live in the space age and have watched rockets and space shuttles take off and return. We have witnessed man walking on the moon. Thanks to TV documentaries, we have seen everything from the conception of a baby to the eruption of a volcano. We have watched flowers grow, fish spawn, and stars become supernovas. There is no more mystery, no more wonder in the world.

A danger facing the church is that we think we know everything there is to know about God, and so we don’t worship Him with wonder.

T.F. Torrance, states it perfectly when he said, “Worship is the exercise of the mind in the contemplation of God in which WONDER and AWE play an important part.”

Perhaps this is one lesson Jesus had in mind when He told His disciples to become as little children.

No wonder the children were busy singing out to Jesus in the temple (Matthew 21) while the theologically trained adults tried to silence them!

Perhaps we can take a liberty with the nursery rhyme and alter the words a little bit:

Twinkle, twinkle, Morning star,
(Revelation 22:16)
How I wonder who you are.
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.
Twinkle, twinkle, Morning star,
How I wonder who you are!

Have a good week wondering,

Pastor Barry

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